Dandelion an herb for springtime and beyond

The medicinal herb Dandelion is a traditional Spring tonic. After a cold British Winter when fresh food was limited, the fresh leaves were eaten as a salad herb at least since the Tudors five hundred years ago. The name Dandelion comes from the French dent de lion meaning "lion's tooth" which describes her tooth shaped leaves. She is not only rich in nutrients like vitamin C, A, K, calcium, and potassium, but she can also stimulate your kidneys and Liver to remove waste metabolic products from your body giving it a gentle Spring cleaning. Recent research raises the possibility that it might be able to support your immune system to inhibit the passage of the covid causing corona virus into human cells.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8538008/

In Vitro Effect of Taraxacum officinale Leaf Aqueous Extract on the Interaction between ACE2 Cell Surface Receptor and SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein D614 and Four Mutants

Why not give yourself a tasty Dandelion pesto treat

Ingredients

• 30 g/cup of Dandelion leaves

• 30 g/cup of Basil leaves

• 2 cloves of garlic crushed

• Half cup pumpkin seeds or pine nuts

• 40 g vegan Parmesan grated finely

• Juice of ½ a lemon

• freshly ground black pepper and salt to taste

Instructions

1. Wash the leaves well.

2. Blend the Dandelion, basil and garlic with enough olive oil to make a loose purée.

3. Mix in the cheese and lemon juice, and season with salt and pepper.

4. Salt the pesto to your taste - it really brings out the flavours.

Notes

• Use leaves that have not be exposed to garden sprays and the like.

• If you find the Dandelion too bitter, you can blanch it in boiling water for one minute then dry before adding it to blender

• Freeze the pesto in ice cube trays to preserve its flavour, nutrition and colour and use at your convenience – it thaws quickly.

This information is for educational purposes only. For any advice on medicinal use of herbs consult a registered Medical Herbalist.

Disclaimer

Knowledge and best practice in the health field are constantly changing.  Each person and illness is also unique and no general information can anticipate every circumstance, nor be appropriate for every reader. Each individual case is best assessed in person by a qualified health advisor.

In the case of remedies or other products, users should read the label carefully for detailed information about safe use and in the case of natural products should choose responsible manufacturers with independently assured quality standards and safety monitoring procedures.

To the fullest extent of the law, neither Richard Adams nor the authors, contributors or editors, assume any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property as a matter of products liability, negligence or otherwise, or from any use or operation of any methods, products, instructions or ideas contained in the materials herein.

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